Skin Cancer & MOHS Surgery

Skin Cancer & MOHS Surgery

Skin Cancer & MOHS Surgery

The numbers alone get your attention. More than 5 million cases of skin cancer are diagnosed annually in the U.S., a number that increases each year. One in five people will get skin cancer during his or her lifetime. Throughout the U.S., including areas around central North Carolina, skin cancer is the most common form of cancer. The good news is it’s also the most preventable – and treatable – of all cancers. The mission at Central Dermatology Center is educating patients about skin cancer prevention and detection. Mohs surgery, Dr. Beth Goldstein’s specialty, is the most effective treatment for many patients diagnosed with skin cancer where it is important to conserve tissue.

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Types of Skin Cancer

There are 3 types of skin cancer that make up the vast majority of diagnosed cases:

Basal cell carcinoma

This is the most common form of all cancers, not just skin cancer. Nearly 8 out of 10 skin cancers are basal cell carcinomas. They typically develop on exposed areas of the skin, most commonly the face and neck, but may occur anywhere. Once treated, basal cell cancers rarely recur in the same spot. People who are diagnosed with basal cell cancer are also more likely to develop similar tumors elsewhere on their bodies.

his is the most common form of all cancer, not just skin cancer. Nearly 8 out of 10 skin cancers are basal cell carcinomas. They typically develop on exposed areas of the skin, most commonly the face and neck, but may occur anywhere. Once treated, basal cell cancers rarely recur in the same spot. People who are diagnosed with basal cell cancer are also more likely to develop similar tumors elsewhere on their bodies.

Squamous cell carcinoma

About 20% of skin cancers are squamous cell carcinomas. They commonly develop on areas of the body exposed to the sun, such as the face, ears, neck, lips, and the backs of the hands. Squamous cell cancers are somewhat more aggressive than basal cell cancers. Aggressive forms of these tumors can spread and invade lymph nodes.

Melanoma

The least common, but most dangerous, form of skin cancer is melanoma. Although melanoma can appear without warning, it may begin as a brand new spot, in or near an existing mole or freckle. It can be pink, brown, black, or multiple colors. Melanomas can be flat or raised.  If detected early, surgery alone is an effective treatment. In later stages, treatment is more complicated.

Once you’ve read more about preventing skin cancer and how to detect it early, request a consultation online or call Central Dermatology Center at (919) 401-1994 to schedule an appointment.

Treatment Options

Once diagnosed, Central Dermatology Center will be your supportive and diligent partner in understanding your treatment options based on the type, condition, and severity of your skin cancer.

Your treatment options may include:

Mohs Surgery

A simple procedure completed in just one office visit under local (not general) anesthesia. Mohs surgery involves the surgeon carefully removing the visible skin cancer as well as an extremely thin margin of surrounding skin. The surgeon then looks at the removed skin under a microscope looking for cancer cells. If they are found, another small area where the cells are located is removed, and is again looked at under the microscope. This process continues until the surgeon no longer sees cancer cells, which allows the patient to keep as much healthy skin as possible.

SRT (Superficial Radiation Therapy)

A non-surgical low energy radiotherapy for the treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer. This FDA-approved process boasts a 95% cure rate with minimal invasiveness and no pain or recovery time in the appropriate patient.

bout 20% of skin cancers are squamous cell carcinomas. They commonly develop on areas of the body exposed to the sun, such as the face, ears, neck, lips, and the backs of the hands. Squamous cell cancers are somewhat more aggressive than basal cell cancers. Aggressive forms of these tumors can spread and invade lymph nodes.

Excisional Surgery

Using a scalpel, your provider removes, or excises, the entire cancerous tumor along with a surrounding border of presumably normal skin as a safety margin, then sends the tissue specimen to a lab to make sure the margins are free of cancer. Depending on its size and location, the wound may be left open to heal or your provider may close it with stitches. If the lab finds evidence of skin cancer beyond the margin, the patient may need to return for another surgery.

Curettage & Electrodessication

A skin cancer treatment used to remove basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas. During the procedure, your provider will scrape the affected skin surface with a curette (a spoon-shaped instrument). After successfully removing the cancerous tissue, your doctor will cauterize the area to increase the chance of success and minimize bleeding. (Also known as a curettage and desiccation.)

Topical Therapies

Your provider will discuss any topical therapy options at an office visit.

Once you’ve read more about preventing skin cancer and how to detect it early, request a consultation online or call Central Dermatology Center at (919) 401-1994 to schedule an appointment.

Contact Us






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    Find the location nearest to you
    Central Dermatology Center
    2238 Nelson Highway #100
    Chapel Hill, NC 27517
    Tel: (919) 401-1994
    Fax: (919) 401-1924
    Skin Care & Laser Center
    2238 Nelson Highway #300
    Chapel Hill, NC 27517
    Tel: (919) 493-3194
    Fax: (919) 401-1924
    Central Dermatology Center
    1212 Cedarhurst Dr. #102
    Raleigh, NC 27609
    Phone: (919) 782-2735
    Fax: (919)-782-2739
    Central Dermatology Center
    110 Preston Executive Dr. #100
    Cary, NC 27513
    Tel: (919) 653-1344
    Fax: (919) 463-0920
    Central Dermatology Center
    1210 Central Dr.
    Sanford, NC 27330
    Tel: (919) 776-5286
    Fax: (919) 774-4226
    Central Dermatology Center
    Pittsboro, NC
    Coming soon!
    Find the location nearest to you
    Central Dermatology Center
    2238 Nelson Highway #100
    Chapel Hill, NC 27517
    Tel: (919) 401-1994
    Fax: (919) 401-1924
    Skin Care & Laser Center
    2238 Nelson Highway #300
    Chapel Hill, NC 27517
    Tel: (919) 493-3194
    Fax: (919) 401-1924
    Central Dermatology Center
    3900 Browning Place, Suite 202
    Raleigh, NC 27609
    Phone: (919) 782-2735
    Fax: (919)-782-2739
    Central Dermatology Center
    110 Preston Executive Dr. #108
    Cary, NC 27513
    Tel: (919) 653-1344
    Fax: (919) 463-0920
    Central Dermatology Center
    1210 Central Dr.
    Sanford, NC 27330
    Tel: (919) 776-5286
    Fax: (919) 774-4226
    Central Dermatology Center
    6387 Ramsey Street
    Fayetteville, NC 28311
    Tel: (910) 900-1098